WARNING – Don’t read this if you want to go back to sleep

You say you want the truth?
OK, if you insist.
But first, you have to repeat after me: War is a Racket’.
Anyone with a rudimentary knowledge of our quest for empire over the past 11 decades realizes that Obama’s contemplation of whether to send additional troops to Afghanistan is simply a function of his Handlers, the Power Elite, providing Obama with the opportunity to look “presidential.” The decision to send additional troops was reached prior to the situational comedy of General McChrystal’s leaked “confidential report” to the Washington Post and Obama’s National Security Advisor’s public admonishment of McChrystal’s failure to follow the chain of command. All of this is nothing but a well-rehearsed, though poorly camouflaged hoax. Additional troops WILL be sent to Afghanistan within a very short period of time and Obama really has no say in the matter. The question we should all be asking is: WHY?

Could it be the US-installed puppet government in Afghanistan has new suitors who represent a very real threat to the United State’s control of Afghanistan and her abundant natural resources? Is the entry of Russia and Chinese influence into Afghanistan the real reason for the need for more troops? Russia reportedly made its entry back in 2007 with the reopening of its embassy in Kabul. The Soviet Foreign Minister, Sergei Ivanov, met privately with President Karzai and offered military assistance through the Collective Security Treaty Organization. The CSTO is made up of Russia, Belarus, Armenia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan. Russia is the driving force in this organization, as one might understand, due to the economic and military weakness of the other members. There were meetings with CSTO delegation in Kabul and neither the US nor the UK were invited. Were the US/UK coalition (NATO) allowed to solidify its position in Afghanistan, it would create a territorial split between Russia, China and Iran. Russia will do whatever is necessary to prevent this growth of power and influence in the region. Flashback to the Bejiing Olympics fiasco in soviet Georgia for confirmation.
Moscow is certainly concerned with the Pentagon’s plan to deploy Special Operations forces into the Central Asian States to conduct “foreign internal defense missions.” This translates into increasing military activity, which is better known by the CFR controlled media as “spreading democracy,” by the barrel of a gun or “fighting terrorism” with our own special brand of terror.
NATO, following the CFR-introduced agenda, is campaigning for increased cooperation with Moscow in the region to “facilitate the fading of Russia’s lingering imperial ambitions.” These are the words of none other than Zbigniew Brzezinski, author of the NATO report. Surely, Putin will see through this smokescreen.
Russia has also cancelled all of Afghanistan’s Soviet-era debts and is moving to help Kabul rebuild the Afghan infrastructure. The increase of trade between Afghanistan and Russia, which was at the $190 million mark in 2008, is also a move to create a vision of Russia as an ally to the people of Afghanistan with the US and NATO appearing as the foreign invader.
What has prompted the governments in Moscow and Beijing to converge with the forces of NATO in Afghanistan? Is it purely a protectionist strategy or are those governments there for the same reason we initiated the war in 2001: an abundance of natural resources?
China has made its moves to secure as many of the natural resources located in Afghanistan as it can. Almost one year ago, in November of 2008, China, acting through the China Metallurgical Group Corporation and the Jiangxi Copper Company, secured the Aynak Copper Mine in Logar Province. This copper mine is reported to be the largest in the world and has been basically inoperative since the Soviet Invasion in 1979. China has agreed to a 2.9-billion dollar investment in the infrastructure of the area including a power plant and possible railroad into Pakistan. If I were an Afghan citizen, whom would I support in my country, a nation that is actually contributing to a better life or one that is indiscriminately bombing my fellow citizens?
Now, when it appears our puppet Karzai may have been influenced by a better offer from Russia, China, or both, the Obama administration, strongly supported by the neocons, is seeking to perhaps replace Karzai with a new election, suddenly proclaiming the election the US just supervised to have been corrupt. Members of both political/criminal parties now openly support the war in Afghanistan as being necessary to our national defense(those boogie-man terrorists), with the question being, not, do we send more troops to Afghanistan to bleed and die for oil and minerals, but how many? I’m sure our influence in NATO will bring about the necessary conclusions in order to facilitate our attempt to replace our own political puppet. Karzai has obviously broken the bonds of US control by participating in meetings outside of the US political purview with China, Russia and even in this agreement, which included Iran and Pakistan. The construction of this pipeline was due to start last month. Russia and China see this new pipeline as crucial to their retention of power in the region and will make the necessary military movements to insure their investments.
Financially crippled due to our continued wars for empire and the printing of billions of new dollars to repay political cronies in the financial world has left us in a precarious position in Afghanistan. We will try to counter the financial prowess of China, to whom we owe billions and their military ties to Russia with the blood and lives of tens of thousands of new US cannon fodder. When China tires of Hillary’s ‘knob-polishing’ offers and calls in our financial markers, what will become of our country?
We are escalating a war we cannot win. How long will it be before Americans realize that their blind patriotic/political allegiance, along with their lives, liberties, and property are all being taxed and exploited for the Racket of their political and financial masters.
Erudio, Strenuus, Restituo
Restore the Republic!
End the Fed.

Directly from the US Department of Education

I am glad to say, St. Patricks elementary will not be participating in this “historic” event.

Menu of Classroom Activities

President Obama’s Address to Students Across America

(PreK-6)

Produced by Teaching Ambassador Fellows, U.S. Department of Education

September 8, 2009

Before the Speech

  • Teachers can build background knowledge about the President of the United States and his speech by reading books about presidents and Barack Obama. Teachers could motivate students by asking the following questions:

Who is the President of the United States?

What do you think it takes to be president?

To whom do you think the president is going to be speaking?

Why do you think he wants to speak to you?

What do you think he will say to you?

  • Teachers can ask students to imagine that they are delivering a speech to all of the students in the United States.

If you were the president, what would you tell students?

What can students do to help in our schools?

Teachers can chart ideas about what students would say.

  • Why is it important that we listen to the president and other elected officials, like the mayor, senators, members of congress, or the governor? Why is what they say important?

During the Speech

  • As the president speaks, teachers can ask students to write down key ideas or phrases that are important or personally meaningful.  Students could use a note-taking graphic organizer such as a “cluster web;” or, students could record their thoughts on sticky notes.  Younger children could draw pictures and write as appropriate.  As students listen to the speech, they could think about the following:

What is the president trying to tell me?

What is the president asking me to do?

What new ideas and actions is the president challenging me to think about?

  • Students could record important parts of the speech where the president is asking them to do something. Students might think about the following:

What specific job is he asking me to do?

Is he asking anything of anyone else?

Teachers? Principals? Parents? The American people?

  • Students could record questions they have while he is speaking and then discuss them after the speech.  Younger children may need to dictate their questions.

After the Speech

  • Teachers could ask students to share the ideas they recorded, exchange sticky notes, or place notes on a butcher-paper poster in the classroom to discuss main ideas from the speech, such as citizenship, personal responsibility, and civic duty.
  • Students could discuss their responses to the following questions:

What do you think the president wants us to do?

Does the speech make you want to do anything?

Are we able to do what President Obama is asking of us?

What would you like to tell the president?

Extension of the Speech

Teachers could extend learning by having students:

  • Create posters of their goals.  Posters could be formatted in quadrants, puzzle pieces, or trails marked with the following labels: personal, academic, community, and country.  Each area could be labeled with three steps for achieving goals in that area. It might make sense to focus first on personal and academic goals so that community and country goals can be more readily created.
  • Write letters to themselves about how they can achieve their short-term and long-term education goals.  Teachers would collect and redistribute these letters at an appropriate later date to enable students to monitor their progress.
  • Write goals on colored index cards or precut designs to post around the classroom.
  • Interview one another and share goals with the class to create a supportive community.
  • Participate in school-wide incentive programs or contests for those students who achieve their goals.
  • Write about their goals in a variety of genres, such as poems, songs, and personal essays.
  • Create artistic projects based on the themes of their goals.
  • Graph individual progress toward goals.

National Keep you kids away from public school day – Sept 8, 2009

This has not broke into main stream media yet.  Any teachers out there that confirm or refute this?

I am checking with my children’s school and if this is true, they will be going to the zoo with me that day.

PreK-6 Menu of Classroom Activities:
President Obama’s Address to Students
Across America
Produced by Teaching Ambassador Fellows, U.S. Department of Education September 8, 2009

Before the Speech:

Teachers can build background knowledge about the President of the United States and his speech by reading books about presidents and Barack Obama and motivate students by asking the following questions: Who is the President of the United States? What do you think it takes to be President? To whom do you think the President is going to be speaking? Why do you think he wants to speak to you? What do you think he will say to you?

Teachers can ask students to imagine being the President delivering a speech to all of the students in the United States. What would you tell students? What can students do to help in our schools? Teachers can chart ideas about what they would say.

Why is it important that we listen to the President and other elected officials, like the mayor, senators, members of congress, or the governor? Why is what they say important?

During the Speech:

As the President speaks, teachers can ask students to write down key ideas or phrases that are important or personally meaningful. Students could use a note-taking graphic organizer such as a Cluster Web, or students could record their thoughts on sticky notes. Younger children can draw pictures and write as appropriate. As students listen to the speech, they could think about the following: What is the President trying to tell me? What is the President asking me to do? What new ideas and actions is the President challenging me to think about?

Students can record important parts of the speech where the President is asking them to do something. Students might think about: What specific job is he asking me to do? Is he asking anything of anyone else? Teachers? Principals? Parents? The American people?

Students can record any questions they have while he is speaking and then discuss them after the speech. Younger children may need to dictate their questions.

After the Speech:

Teachers could ask students to share the ideas they recorded, exchange sticky notes or stick notes on a butcher paper poster in the classroom to discuss main ideas from the speech, i.e. citizenship, personal responsibility, civic duty.

Students could discuss their responses to the following questions: What do you think the President wants us to do? Does the speech make you want to do anything? Are we able to do what President Obama is asking of us? What would you like to tell the President?

Teachers could encourage students to participate in the Department of Education’s “I Am What I Learn” video contest.
On September 8th
the Department will invite K-12 students to submit a video no longer than 2 min, explaining why education is important and how their education will help them achieve their dreams. Teachers are welcome to incorporate the same or a similar video project into an assignment. More details will be released via http://www.ed.gov.

Extension of the Speech: Teachers can extend learning by having students create posters of their goals. Posters could be formatted in quadrants or puzzle pieces or trails marked with the labels: personal, academic, community, country. Each area could be labeled with three steps for achieving goals in those areas. It might make sense to focus on personal and academic so community and country goals come more readily.

Write letters to themselves about what they can do to help the president. These would be collected and redistributed at an appropriate later date by the teacher to make students accountable to their goals.

Write goals on colored index cards or precut designs to post around the classroom.

Interview and share about their goals with one another to create a supportive community.

Participate in School wide incentive programs or contests for students who achieve their goals.

Write about their goals in a variety of genres, i.e. poems, songs, personal essays.

Create artistic projects based on the themes of their goals.

Graph student progress toward goals.