Be Careful Shoveling Snow this Winter

This is one of the busiest times of year in a chiropractor’s office.  Sudden efforts to clear the drive from tons of snow can really aggravate back problems.

Here are some excerpts from a recent article at www.consumeraffairs.com

Aching back

According to the seventeen-year study, appearing in the January 2011 issue of the American Journal of Emergency Medicine, the most common injury diagnoses were soft tissue injuries (55 percent), lacerations (16 percent) and fractures (seven percent). The lower back was the most frequently injured region of the body (34 percent), followed by injuries to the arms and hands (16 percent), and head (15 percent). Acute musculoskeletal exertion (54 percent), slips or falls (20 percent) and being struck by a snow shovel (15 percent) were the most frequent mechanisms of snow shovel-related injuries.

Shoveling tips

The following are a few additional tips for preventing injuries when shoveling snow:

  • Warm up with light exercise before you start.
  • Make sure to pace yourself by taking frequent breaks for rest.
  • The best way to clear snow is by pushing it instead of lifting.
  • Ergonomically designed shovels are a great choice to reduce the need for bending and heavy lifting.
  • When possible, avoid large shoveling jobs by clearing snow several times throughout the day.
  • Remember to wear warm clothing, including a hat, gloves and slip-resistant, high-traction footwear.

Remember my three day rule, “If a pain persists into a third day or is very sharp in certain movements, it’s time to see the chiropractor.”

My new video defining the word PAIN

Hey everyone!  Long time no see.  🙂  I hope everyone had an awesome summer, I know I did.  Hanging out with my wife and children is the best experience of my life.  I can’t get enough of it.  Hey, I whipped up a new video and would really appreciate your feedback.

Let me know:

Did I get my point across?

Was the information useful?

Did it help?

Would you share this with your friends on facebook?

Enjoy, it’s quick and easy, about 6 minutes long.

Please take a moment to talk to someone about Missouri Prop C today

Below is the new law in it’s entirety.  I would really appreciate any comments or concerns about this.  I have read it many times and really like what it says.  It basically insures that we can work together to keep your medical records out of the reach of the government.

Why does the IRS (Internal Revenue Service) need to know my BMI (Basic Metabolic Index)(how fat I am)?

On August 3, 2010 Please vote YES on Missouri prop C, and when you talk to your friends and neighbors ask them to support us.

Also, let them know about me.  Many of them are being mistreated by the medical system for things I can quickly fix.  I will waive the initial exam fee of $40.00 for them in your honor.

Here is prop C:

Back to Missouri Health Care Freedom Amendment, Proposition C (2010)

Proposition C will appear on the August 3, 2010 statewide ballot in Missouri. If approved by voters the measure would repeal Section A. Section 375.1175, RSMo, and enact two new sections to be known as sections 1.330 and 375.1175. The new sections would read as follows:[1]
Text

1.330. 1. No law or rule shall compel, directly or indirectly, any person, employer, or health care provider to participate in any health care system.
2. A person or employer may pay directly for lawful health care services and shall not be required by law or rule to pay penalties or fines for paying directly for lawful health care services. A health care provider may accept direct payment for lawful health care services and shall not be required by law or rule to pay penalties or fines for accepting direct payment from a person or employer for lawful health care services.
3. Subject to reasonable and necessary rules that do not substantially limit a person’s options, the purchase or sale of health insurance in private health care systems shall not be prohibited by law or rule.
4. This section does not:
(1) Affect which health care services a health care provider or hospital is required to perform or provide;
(2) Affect which health care services are permitted by law;
(3) Prohibit care provided under workers’ compensation as provided under state law;
(4) Affect laws or regulations in effect as of January 1, 2010;
(5) Affect the terms or conditions of any health care system to the extent that those terms and conditions do not have the effect of punishing a person or employer for paying directly for lawful health care services or a health care provider or hospital for accepting direct payment from a person or employer for lawful health care services.
5. As used in this section, the following terms shall mean:
(1) “Compel”, any penalties or fines;
(2) “Direct payment or pay directly”, payment for lawful health care services without a public or private third party, not including an employer, paying for any portion of the service;
(3) “Health care system”, any public or private entity whose function or purpose is the management of, processing of, enrollment of individuals for or payment for, in full or in part, health care services or health care data or health care information for its participants;
(4) “Lawful health care services”, any health-related service or treatment to the extent that the service or treatment is permitted or not prohibited by law or regulation that may be provided by persons or businesses otherwise permitted to offer such services; and
(5) “Penalties or fines”, any civil or criminal penalty or fine, tax, salary or wage withholding or surcharge or any named fee with a similar effect established by law or rule by a government established, created or controlled agency that is used to punish or discourage the exercise of rights protected under this section.
375.1175. 1. The director may petition the court for an order directing him to liquidate a domestic insurer or an alien insurer domiciled in this state on the basis:
(1) Of any ground for an order of rehabilitation as specified in section 375.1165, whether or not there has been a prior order directing the rehabilitation of the insurer;
(2) That the insurer is insolvent;
(3) That the insurer is in such condition that the further transaction of business would be hazardous, financially or otherwise, to its policyholders, its creditors or the public;
(4) That the insurer is found to be in such condition after examination that it could not meet the requirements for incorporation and authorization specified in the law under which it was incorporated or is doing business; or
(5) That the insurer has ceased to transact the business of insurance for a period of one year.
2. Notwithstanding any other provision of this chapter, a domestic insurer organized as a stock insurance company may voluntarily dissolve and liquidate as a corporation under sections 351.462 to 351.482, provided that:
(1) The director, in his or her sole discretion, approves the articles of dissolution prior to filing such articles with the secretary of state. In determining whether to approve or disapprove the articles of dissolution, the director shall consider, among other factors, whether:
(a) The insurer’s annual financial statements filed with the director show no written insurance premiums for five years; and
(b) The insurer has demonstrated that all policyholder claims have been satisfied or have been transferred to another insurer in a transaction approved by the director; and
(c) An examination of the insurer pursuant to sections 374.202 to 374.207 has been completed within the last five years; and
(2) The domestic insurer files with the secretary of state a copy of the director’s approval, certified by the director, along with articles of dissolution as provided in section 351.462 or 351.468.

Let’s fix the health care system

The “health care system” is easily fixable.

1. Stop the insane practice of trying to buy risk indemnities against the results of our own irresponsible behaviors. Health insurance encourages irresponsible behavior.

2.  Local government provides emergency services and community education and fitness centers.

3. Hire Chiropractic Physicians as gate keepers to the health care system. Chiropractors are uniquely licensed to provide portal of entry exam and diagnostic services, but cannot prescribe drugs so are not susceptible to the pharmaceutical industry. This has already been tried to a savings of more than 50% in overall health care expenditure for Illinois Blue Cross and Blue Shield between the years of 2001 and 2006.

Medicine’s New Direction:

By: Dr. Jeffrey S. Bland, PhD

 Osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, periodontal disease, coronary heart disease, metabolic syndrome, and type-2 diabetes — these common and very different diseases typically require separate and different medical protocols.

 In August 2007, a collaborative group of medical scientists from Columbia University, University of Cambridge, Penn State Medical Center, Northwestern University School of Medicine, and the Laboratory for Endocrinology Research in Lyon, France, authored a research paper that caught the attention of the medical world.

Their conclusion: The skeleton is an endocrine organ and has an effect on insulin signaling and adiponectin expression in adipocytes (fat cells). (1)

 This extraordinary discovery links obesity, insulin resistance/metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and heart disease to bone physiology and the bone-derived hormone osteocalcin that regulates energy metabolism and the insulin/glucose axis.  Osteocalcin “speaks” to adipocytes and insulin secreting beta-cells of the pancreas, and influences both insulin action and insulin-sensitizing and the anti-inflammatory protein adiponectin.  In essence, the report defined skeletal health and function as principle factors in the risk to diseases of metabolism and demonstrated a direct relationship between skeletal health and the prevention of diabetes and heart disease.

 BEYOND ‘WEAR AND TEAR’

Skeletal health is dependent upon lifestyle, genetic, structural, and nutritional factors.  The lack of weight-bearing activities reduces the activity of the bone rebuilding osteoblast, in turn reducing the release of osteocalcin.  The reduction in osteocalcin adversely influences insulin signaling and increases the risk to many chronic diseases. These same factors play important roles in maintaining the functional health of the bone remodeling cells: osteoblasts and osteoclasts.

The complex interconnections among these various cell types help explain the recent recognition of the connection between osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.  We now know osteoarthritis is not simply the result of “wear and tear” on the joint.  Rather, it results from an inflammatory process that engages bone, synovium, connective tissue, and joint lubricant substances.

 Inflammatory processes are found in the joint space with increased osteoclastogenesis and angiogenesis, the hallmarks of progressive osteoarthritis. (2)  Musculoskeletal integrity is critically important in reducing the risk to inflammation.  The problem in osteoarthritis is not just wear and tear; it is how the musculoskeletal system responds to stress factors influencing the release of inflammatory mediators, such as interleukin-1, interleukin-6, or tumor necrosis factor alpha.  That these characteristics are also factors in the etiology of rheumatoid arthritis suggests a common therapeutic approach to the prevention and management of both conditions.

 MODIFYING KINASE ACTIVITY

The inflammatory signaling process connecting the etiology of these seemingly disparate diseases is, to a great extent, regulated by the activity of a family of enzymes termed “kinases.”  Produced in every cell, kinases regulate the translation of events that occur outside the cell to the genes of the cell, triggering various cellular events, such as the inflammatory response.   The activation of the inflammatory family of kinases may result in a variety of clinical effects, such as type-2 diabetes, arthritis, heart disease, metabolic syndrome, and even certain forms of cancer. (3)

 Certain phytonutrients and other natural compounds have been found to modulate kinase function and serve as “brakes” that help prevent the inflammatory process from running out of control. (4)  Well-publicized examples of such compounds include hops-derived reduced iso-alpha acids and O-methylated catechins from tea leaves. (5, 6)

These compounds may be used in supplementary form to “reset” inflammatory kinase signaling, thereby influencing any cell types that have enhanced inflammatory functions.  Their role in regulating the signaling that induces the primary cause of the disease suggests these compounds have promise as a new class of therapeutics that treats the intersection of the cause of a family of chronic diseases with a shared mechanism of origin. (7)

 CROSS TALK AND SYSTEMIC DISEASE

Altered mechanical signaling through the connective tissue and fascia has been found to increase the production of inflammatory mediators that may contribute to the potentiation of the underlying cause of diseases as far ranging as arthritis, type-2 diabetes, and bone loss of osteoporosis. (8)  This discovery suggests a mechanistic role for physical medicine, structural medicine, and acupuncture in the treatment of these conditions. (9)  Interesting, too, is the fact that in September 2007 the National Institutes of Health provided funding for the first international conference on fascia. (10)  This conference brought together bodywork practitioners with basic scientists to better understand the role of fascia in chronic disease and what can be done to improve its function.

 Out of the conference emerged the recognition that the extracellular matrix, with its component connective tissue, serves not only a structural role, but also a signaling role, translating outside information to various cells.  The translation of these messages through the fascia affects kinase signaling and different inflammatory responses.

This once again demonstrates the “cross talk” that occurs among different tissues that sets up the potential for many different diseases.  In another example, it is increasingly accepted that obesity, in and of itself, does not cause diabetes and heart disease. Rather, obesity is an effect of a process associated with the infiltration of various tissues, such as the fat tissue, with pro-inflammatory immune cells. (11)  This inflammatory process triggers the pathology of obesity and relates to the cause of type-2 diabetes and heart disease.  For obese patients, a treatment plan that seeks to nutritionally modulate kinases associated with the inflammatory process while improving body composition may be a more effective approach than weight loss alone.

 CLINICAL APPLICATIONS

These extraordinary recent advances in the understanding of the etiology of chronic diseases that previously seemed so different from one another have now created the understanding that they all share common mechanisms of etiology.  Rather than treating the disease effect, the new medicine is to treat the cause.   Additionally, environmental factors, such as chronic infection, xenobiotic or heavy-metal toxicity, or intestinal dysbiosis and food allergy can increase the inflammatory response.  These are modifiable if the practitioner asks the patient the correct questions, including questions about family history, personal health history, diet, environment, lifestyle, and exercise patterns.

 Consequently, a patient with a history of chronic inflammatory disorders would be a candidate for a personalized intervention program that incorporates regular musculoskeletal therapy and a healthy diet, plus nutritional intervention that might include a low-allergy-potential diet; supplementary intake of anti-inflammatory phytonutrients that modulate kinase function; fish oils containing omega-3 EPA/DHA; and botanicals, such as Curcumin, Boswellia serata, and ginger.

Supplementation with probiotics, such as specific strains of Lactobaccilli and Bifidobacterium, might also be administered to improve gastrointestinal immune function and reduce inflammation.

 These are exciting times related to the advancement in the understanding of the mechanisms of origin of chronic disease.  These advancements are timely because, if a new model for the prevention and management of chronic disease is not soon found, the rising tide of age-related chronic disease will economically drown the aging baby boomers in healthcare expenditures.  The news from the latest research indicates a new paradigm in healthcare is evolving, and with it, a validation of the importance of a functional medicine approach to chronic disease that integrates lifestyle, environment, physical and structural medicine, diet, and nutrient therapies, with the focus on managing the intersection of the root cause of the diseases.

 Jeffrey Bland, PhD, FACN, is the chief science officer of Metagenics Inc. and president of MetaProteomics in Gig Harbor, Wash.  In 1991, he founded the Institute for Functional Medicine.  He can be reached at (800) 692.9400 or through the Web site, www.metagenics.com.

 References

1 Lee NK, Sowa H, Hinoi E, et al. Endocrine regulation of energy metabolism by the skeleton. Cell. 2007;130(3):456-469.

2 Bonnet CS, Walsh DA. Osteoarthritis, angiogenesis and inflammation. Rheumatology. 2005;44:7-16.

3 Bain J, McLauchlan H, Elliott M, Cohen P. The specificities of protein kinase inhibitors: an update. Biochem J. 2003;371(Pt 1):199-204.

4 Suzuki T, Miyata N. Epigenetic control using natural products and synthetic molecules. Curr Med Chem. 2006:13(8):935-958.

5 Minich DM, Bland JS, Katke J, et al. Clinical safety and efficacy of NG440: a novel combination of rho iso-alpha acids from hops, rosemary, and oleanolic acid for inflammatory conditions. Can J Physiol Pharmacol. 2007;85(9):872-883.

6 Maeda-Yamamoto M, Inagaki N, Kitaura J, et al. O-methylated catechins from tea leaves inhibit multiple protein kinases in mast cells. J Immunol. 2004;172(7):4486-4492.

7 Lila MA. From beans to berries and beyond: teamwork between plant chemicals for protection of optimal human health. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2007;1114:372-380.

8 Langevin HM, Churchill DL, Cipolla MJ. Mechanical signaling through connective tissue: a mechanism for the therapeutic effect of acupuncture. FASEB J. 2001;15(12):2275-2282.

9 Langevin HM, Yandow JA. Relationship of acupuncture points and meridians to connective tissue planes. Anat Rec. 2002;269(6):

257-265.

10 Grimm D. Cell biology meets rolfing. Science. 2007;318:

1234-1235.

11 Segenès C, Miranville A, Lolmède K, Curat CA, Bouloumiè A. The role of endothelial cells in inflamed adipose tissue. J Intern Med. 2007;262:415-421.

Chiropractic and risk of stroke, real science vs Health magazine sensationalism

Risk of Vertebrobasilar Stroke and Chiropractic Care: Results of a Population-Based Case-Control and Case-Crossover Study.

Supplementary Research Studies

Spine. 33(4S) Supplement:S176-S183, February 15, 2008.
Cassidy, J David DC, PhD, DrMedSc *+++; Boyle, Eleanor PhD *; Cote, Pierre DC, PhD *+++[S]; He, Yaohua MD, PhD *; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah PhD +[S]; Silver, Frank L. MD, FRCPC [P][//]; Bondy, Susan J. PhD +

Abstract:
Study Design. Population-based, case-control and case-crossover study.

Objective. To investigate associations between chiropractic visits and vertebrobasilar artery (VBA) stroke and to contrast this with primary care physician (PCP) visits and VBA stroke.

Summary of Background Data. Chiropractic care is popular for neck pain and headache, but may increase the risk for VBA dissection and stroke. Neck pain and headache are common symptoms of VBA dissection, which commonly precedes VBA stroke.

Methods. Cases included eligible incident VBA strokes admitted to Ontario hospitals from April 1, 1993 to March 31, 2002. Four controls were age and gender matched to each case. Case and control exposures to chiropractors and PCPs were determined from health billing records in the year before the stroke date. In the case-crossover analysis, cases acted as their own controls.

Results. There were 818 VBA strokes hospitalized in a population of more than 100 million person-years. In those aged <45 years, cases were about three times more likely to see a chiropractor or a PCP before their stroke than controls. Results were similar in the case control and case crossover analyses. There was no increased association between chiropractic visits and VBA stroke in those older than 45 years. Positive associations were found between PCP visits and VBA stroke in all age groups. Practitioner visits billed for headache and neck complaints were highly associated with subsequent VBA stroke.

Conclusion. VBA stroke is a very rare event in the population. The increased risks of VBA stroke associated with chiropractic and PCP visits is likely due to patients with headache and neck pain from VBA dissection seeking care before their stroke. We found no evidence of excess risk of VBA stroke associated chiropractic care compared to primary care.

(C) 2008 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.