The living puzzle we call our body.

As always, I am constantly trying to come up with the wording to help people understand the difference between what I do and what happens at a typical medical doctors office.

This morning the following analogy came to mind.  I would love your input.  Does this help explain things, or does it just make it more confusing?

Your body is made up of trillions of cells.  These cells are arranged into tissues, organs and organ systems that work together to perform the various activities needed to keep the community (body) alive.  Think of it as a complex moving puzzle.  

When you go to a typical medical doctor with a problem s/he is going to perform a series of exams that may include blood work, xrays, sonograms, MRIs, and other tests.  The purpose of these exams is to take the puzzle apart and look at the smaller pieces more closely to try and determine what exactly is causing your discomfort.  Their entire system is based on this reductionist model of the body.  Their preferred treatments are based on taking over for what ever piece of the puzzle isn’t working right with external chemical or surgical interventions. 

What i do is interview you to see where you’ve been, where you are now, and where you want to go with the remainder of your life.  I perform a few orthopedic and neurological tests to get your body to show me what it is dealing with.  Then I set about restoring things to a more natural configuration, allowing the innate intelligence of the body to regenerate itself into a more vigorous and happy formation moving forward.  

Sometimes aggressive intervention is necessary.  But I have found over the years, most of the time, my methods are much more likely to produce a happy outcome in both the short and long term with far fewer side effects and subsequent illness.

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The Chiropractic adjustment cannot cause a stroke.

ICA – Internal Carotid Artery – damage to this vessel can cause a stroke

SMT – Spinal Manipulative Therapy – A Chiropractic Adjustment

 

“The researchers therefore conclude that “cervical SMT, as performed by the trained doctors of chiropractic in this study, did not appear to place undue strain on the ICA and thus does not seem to be a factor in ICA injuries.”

 

http://www.news-medical.net/news/20121211/Spinal-manipulations-do-not-overstrain-internal-carotid-artery.aspx

Settling In to the new Clinic

I can’t say enough about how nice the energy is at our new location.  Everyone smiles just walking into the place.

I thought I would post a few pictures for everyone that has not stopped by yet.

I also wanted to remind everyone there is only one week left of the Grand Opening Special of buying 10 wellness treatments for $300.00 any method of payment.  After this week it goes back to it’s regular price of $400.00.

Please ask about the new Acugraph on your next visit and I will mark your file for a free Acupuncture exam.  This amazing computer technology is able to read your meridian energy and generate a complete report within minutes.  We will soon be charging $60.00 for this exam and report so make sure you reserve your’s now!

Anyway, here are some pictures.  They don’t come close to matching the light and energy of this place.  You have to see it in person to understand what I’m saying.  See you soon.

DrD

 

 

Chronic low back does better with regular chiropractic care

Original article here

Abstract

 Study Design. A prospective single blinded placebo controlled study was conducted.

Objective. to assess the effectiveness of spinal manipulation therapy (SMT) for the management of chronic non-specific low back pain (LBP) and to determine the effectiveness of maintenance SMT in long-term reduction of pain and disability levels associated with chronic low-back conditions after an initial phase of treatments.

Summary of background. SMT is a common treatment option for low back pain. Numerous clinical trials have attempted to evaluate its effectiveness for different subgroups of acute and chronic LBP but the efficacy of maintenance SMT in chronic non-specific LBP has not been studied.

Subjects and Methods. 60 patients with chronic, nonspecific LBP lasting at least 6 months were randomized to receive either (1) 12 treatments of sham SMT over a one-month period, (2) 12 treatments, consisting of SMT over a one-month period, but no treatments for the subsequent nine months, or (3) 12 treatments over a one-month period, along with “maintenance spinal manipulation” every two weeks for the following nine months. To determine any difference among therapies, we measured pain and disability scores, generic health status, and back-specific patient satisfaction at baseline and at 1-month, 4-month, 7-month and 10-month intervals.

Results: Patients in second and third groups experienced significantly lower pain and disability scores than first group at the end of 1-month period (P = 0.0027 and 0.0029 respectively). However, only the third group that was given spinal manipulations during the follow-up period showed more improvement in pain and disability scores at the 10-month evaluation. In the no maintained SMT group, however, the mean pain and disability scores returned back near to their pretreatment level.

Conclusion. SMT is effective for the treatment of chronic non specific LBP. To obtain long-term benefit, this study suggests maintenance spinal manipulations after the initial intensive manipulative therapy.

(C) 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.