Thoughts on Equality

I so look forward to getting to work each morning. I revel in the opportunity to help people recover from serious health problems.

My thoughts this morning are again on equality. Can two individual human beings be equal? I like to split the human experience into four parts. Which of these parts can be brought to equal across a group of people?

Time (24 hours/day)                    – Time (24 hours/day)
Talent (10,000 different skills)   – Talent (different cluster of natural skills)
Training (compounds over time) – Training – (different paths lead to different places)
Treasure (hand-me-downs)         – Treasure (more debt than treasure)
________________________________________________________________
Success (fulfilled and generous)    -Failure (fearful and dangerous)

These factors carry varying weight and can shift as time passes.

Notice the only part of this equation that is actually equal on both sides is time.

Time is where we are equal.

What we each do with our time as it passes creates separation or understanding between us. Then the beat goes on….  Each pulse we all loose time, gain experience, face challenges, and live on.

Dealing with personal paradox

This is something I meditate on regularly. How can I speak up on issues I find important when they seem to counter to each other?   How can I assemble a workable world view when the various parts are in conflict with each other?

 

For example, I spend most of my days trying to help Life express itself by removing distortions, imbalances, or stagnation in the flow of chi through the skeleton, skin, mind and nervous system.  It would be easy to assume, and you would be right that I am against abortion.

I am a veteran, father, Oathkeeper, watchdog, guardian and other duties.  Which explains why I am in strong support of the 2nd amendment of the formative contract that allows a government to exist among a free people.

How do these seemingly opposite positions come together in a single world view?  I’ll answer this in the comments later today.  Please feel free to chime in.

DrD

Doctor – Patient – Confidentiality

When I graduated from Cleveland Chiropractic College and earned my Doctorate Degree, one of the things I had learned was the importance of keeping everything the patient told me completely confidential.
(Confidential – to be kept private, not shared, not discussed with anyone else, not revealed without direct instruction from the patient.)

I still take that responsibility very seriously.  Nothing you say to me during a treatment session will ever be repeated outside that door, without your direct instructions.

But over the past 20 years, I have seen a loss of expectation for privacy in our health records.

Now, the intimate details of our lives, illnesses, sufferings, and frailties are connected with our financial records and distributed across the globe. To potential employers, future spouse, colleges, ex-wives, police, lawyers, salesmen, anyone interested in us.

Call me old fashioned, but I will not participate in this attack on your privacy.  If you trust me as your doctor, I will keep records in a hand written format.  Everything stays confidential and between you and me.  Nothing leaves my files except directly to you.  (or your next of kin)

So if you have a bad back, but don’t want your employer to know.  Get in here.

If you need a safe ear to share your troubles, I promise to keep it confidential.  (Unless you tell me your an axe murderer)

If something is going on with your kid, and you are afraid it might affect his chances for a scholarship, I can help.

There are so many situations the details of your health condition should be private, I am an oasis of privacy.

Let me help

Call the clinic at 816-436-9355 and set up a confidential appointment right now.

Be Careful Shoveling Snow this Winter

This is one of the busiest times of year in a chiropractor’s office.  Sudden efforts to clear the drive from tons of snow can really aggravate back problems.

Here are some excerpts from a recent article at www.consumeraffairs.com

Aching back

According to the seventeen-year study, appearing in the January 2011 issue of the American Journal of Emergency Medicine, the most common injury diagnoses were soft tissue injuries (55 percent), lacerations (16 percent) and fractures (seven percent). The lower back was the most frequently injured region of the body (34 percent), followed by injuries to the arms and hands (16 percent), and head (15 percent). Acute musculoskeletal exertion (54 percent), slips or falls (20 percent) and being struck by a snow shovel (15 percent) were the most frequent mechanisms of snow shovel-related injuries.

Shoveling tips

The following are a few additional tips for preventing injuries when shoveling snow:

  • Warm up with light exercise before you start.
  • Make sure to pace yourself by taking frequent breaks for rest.
  • The best way to clear snow is by pushing it instead of lifting.
  • Ergonomically designed shovels are a great choice to reduce the need for bending and heavy lifting.
  • When possible, avoid large shoveling jobs by clearing snow several times throughout the day.
  • Remember to wear warm clothing, including a hat, gloves and slip-resistant, high-traction footwear.

Remember my three day rule, “If a pain persists into a third day or is very sharp in certain movements, it’s time to see the chiropractor.”

PRESENTING: MINUTES TO MEMORIES, reconnecting body mind and spirit

I am honored to present to you the first talk radio show that I am looking forward to listening to.  That’s because

I’M THE HOST!!!

6 pm every Friday from now until they run me off, I will be on internet radio www.jackaloperadio.com

Most gracious thanks goes out to my new producer Mr. Todd Sheets, what a cool dude.  He will be there with me to make sure everything sounds great.

My first show is this Friday at 6 pm CDT.  I am going to explain the theme of the show, tell my story, and review potential topics for future discussions.

I am lining up a fine list of guest speakers and like this blog I will ask the difficult questions and expect responses.

I invite you to join me, with your phone or computer, at http://www.jackaloperadio.com

Healthy living and Acupuncture Seminars!

It is finally official!

My 64 hour seminar series will kick of in a couple of weeks!

April 10-11,`2010

Saturday
Explanation of Qi – what is it, why is it important.
Living in the post Google world
24 hour cycle of energy
Sleep Disorders
Asthma, upper respiratory issues.
Lung Meridian System and points

Sunday
Ah Shi and circle the dragon acupressure
Fluoride – recent fact and myths
Detoxification programs
Large Intestine meridian system and points
Label reading and shopping tips

These classes are approved for Continued Education for Chiropractors, Nurses, and Massage Therapists. But are designed for anyone interested in taking control of their own health care needs.  You will walk away with a head full of new and interesting information no matter what level you are at now!

Continued Education certification is $80.00 per day. (pre-registered)
Non-certificate audit attendance is $50.00 per day. (pre-registered)

$20.00 at the door charge for non-registered attendance.  Space is limited so let me know if you plan to attend ASAP.

The entire course is 64 hours of class room with a certification test and diploma. ( 20% discount if prepaid ) Graduates will be invited to participate in all future seminars and business relationships to duplicate and spread this knowledge far and wide.

Dates for the first round of the seminar series include:

April 10-11, 2010

May 15-16, 2010

June 5-6, 2010

July 10-11, 2010

Second series dates:

August 14-15, 2010

September 11-12, 2010

October 9-10, 2010

November 6-7, 2010

Dress comfortable because there will be exercise training, think about bringing a partner to train with.

WARNING:  These are not “BUTT” hours, and all you doctors out there know what I’m talking about.  Plan to participate or please get your hours somewhere else.

Medicine’s New Direction:

By: Dr. Jeffrey S. Bland, PhD

 Osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, periodontal disease, coronary heart disease, metabolic syndrome, and type-2 diabetes — these common and very different diseases typically require separate and different medical protocols.

 In August 2007, a collaborative group of medical scientists from Columbia University, University of Cambridge, Penn State Medical Center, Northwestern University School of Medicine, and the Laboratory for Endocrinology Research in Lyon, France, authored a research paper that caught the attention of the medical world.

Their conclusion: The skeleton is an endocrine organ and has an effect on insulin signaling and adiponectin expression in adipocytes (fat cells). (1)

 This extraordinary discovery links obesity, insulin resistance/metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and heart disease to bone physiology and the bone-derived hormone osteocalcin that regulates energy metabolism and the insulin/glucose axis.  Osteocalcin “speaks” to adipocytes and insulin secreting beta-cells of the pancreas, and influences both insulin action and insulin-sensitizing and the anti-inflammatory protein adiponectin.  In essence, the report defined skeletal health and function as principle factors in the risk to diseases of metabolism and demonstrated a direct relationship between skeletal health and the prevention of diabetes and heart disease.

 BEYOND ‘WEAR AND TEAR’

Skeletal health is dependent upon lifestyle, genetic, structural, and nutritional factors.  The lack of weight-bearing activities reduces the activity of the bone rebuilding osteoblast, in turn reducing the release of osteocalcin.  The reduction in osteocalcin adversely influences insulin signaling and increases the risk to many chronic diseases. These same factors play important roles in maintaining the functional health of the bone remodeling cells: osteoblasts and osteoclasts.

The complex interconnections among these various cell types help explain the recent recognition of the connection between osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.  We now know osteoarthritis is not simply the result of “wear and tear” on the joint.  Rather, it results from an inflammatory process that engages bone, synovium, connective tissue, and joint lubricant substances.

 Inflammatory processes are found in the joint space with increased osteoclastogenesis and angiogenesis, the hallmarks of progressive osteoarthritis. (2)  Musculoskeletal integrity is critically important in reducing the risk to inflammation.  The problem in osteoarthritis is not just wear and tear; it is how the musculoskeletal system responds to stress factors influencing the release of inflammatory mediators, such as interleukin-1, interleukin-6, or tumor necrosis factor alpha.  That these characteristics are also factors in the etiology of rheumatoid arthritis suggests a common therapeutic approach to the prevention and management of both conditions.

 MODIFYING KINASE ACTIVITY

The inflammatory signaling process connecting the etiology of these seemingly disparate diseases is, to a great extent, regulated by the activity of a family of enzymes termed “kinases.”  Produced in every cell, kinases regulate the translation of events that occur outside the cell to the genes of the cell, triggering various cellular events, such as the inflammatory response.   The activation of the inflammatory family of kinases may result in a variety of clinical effects, such as type-2 diabetes, arthritis, heart disease, metabolic syndrome, and even certain forms of cancer. (3)

 Certain phytonutrients and other natural compounds have been found to modulate kinase function and serve as “brakes” that help prevent the inflammatory process from running out of control. (4)  Well-publicized examples of such compounds include hops-derived reduced iso-alpha acids and O-methylated catechins from tea leaves. (5, 6)

These compounds may be used in supplementary form to “reset” inflammatory kinase signaling, thereby influencing any cell types that have enhanced inflammatory functions.  Their role in regulating the signaling that induces the primary cause of the disease suggests these compounds have promise as a new class of therapeutics that treats the intersection of the cause of a family of chronic diseases with a shared mechanism of origin. (7)

 CROSS TALK AND SYSTEMIC DISEASE

Altered mechanical signaling through the connective tissue and fascia has been found to increase the production of inflammatory mediators that may contribute to the potentiation of the underlying cause of diseases as far ranging as arthritis, type-2 diabetes, and bone loss of osteoporosis. (8)  This discovery suggests a mechanistic role for physical medicine, structural medicine, and acupuncture in the treatment of these conditions. (9)  Interesting, too, is the fact that in September 2007 the National Institutes of Health provided funding for the first international conference on fascia. (10)  This conference brought together bodywork practitioners with basic scientists to better understand the role of fascia in chronic disease and what can be done to improve its function.

 Out of the conference emerged the recognition that the extracellular matrix, with its component connective tissue, serves not only a structural role, but also a signaling role, translating outside information to various cells.  The translation of these messages through the fascia affects kinase signaling and different inflammatory responses.

This once again demonstrates the “cross talk” that occurs among different tissues that sets up the potential for many different diseases.  In another example, it is increasingly accepted that obesity, in and of itself, does not cause diabetes and heart disease. Rather, obesity is an effect of a process associated with the infiltration of various tissues, such as the fat tissue, with pro-inflammatory immune cells. (11)  This inflammatory process triggers the pathology of obesity and relates to the cause of type-2 diabetes and heart disease.  For obese patients, a treatment plan that seeks to nutritionally modulate kinases associated with the inflammatory process while improving body composition may be a more effective approach than weight loss alone.

 CLINICAL APPLICATIONS

These extraordinary recent advances in the understanding of the etiology of chronic diseases that previously seemed so different from one another have now created the understanding that they all share common mechanisms of etiology.  Rather than treating the disease effect, the new medicine is to treat the cause.   Additionally, environmental factors, such as chronic infection, xenobiotic or heavy-metal toxicity, or intestinal dysbiosis and food allergy can increase the inflammatory response.  These are modifiable if the practitioner asks the patient the correct questions, including questions about family history, personal health history, diet, environment, lifestyle, and exercise patterns.

 Consequently, a patient with a history of chronic inflammatory disorders would be a candidate for a personalized intervention program that incorporates regular musculoskeletal therapy and a healthy diet, plus nutritional intervention that might include a low-allergy-potential diet; supplementary intake of anti-inflammatory phytonutrients that modulate kinase function; fish oils containing omega-3 EPA/DHA; and botanicals, such as Curcumin, Boswellia serata, and ginger.

Supplementation with probiotics, such as specific strains of Lactobaccilli and Bifidobacterium, might also be administered to improve gastrointestinal immune function and reduce inflammation.

 These are exciting times related to the advancement in the understanding of the mechanisms of origin of chronic disease.  These advancements are timely because, if a new model for the prevention and management of chronic disease is not soon found, the rising tide of age-related chronic disease will economically drown the aging baby boomers in healthcare expenditures.  The news from the latest research indicates a new paradigm in healthcare is evolving, and with it, a validation of the importance of a functional medicine approach to chronic disease that integrates lifestyle, environment, physical and structural medicine, diet, and nutrient therapies, with the focus on managing the intersection of the root cause of the diseases.

 Jeffrey Bland, PhD, FACN, is the chief science officer of Metagenics Inc. and president of MetaProteomics in Gig Harbor, Wash.  In 1991, he founded the Institute for Functional Medicine.  He can be reached at (800) 692.9400 or through the Web site, www.metagenics.com.

 References

1 Lee NK, Sowa H, Hinoi E, et al. Endocrine regulation of energy metabolism by the skeleton. Cell. 2007;130(3):456-469.

2 Bonnet CS, Walsh DA. Osteoarthritis, angiogenesis and inflammation. Rheumatology. 2005;44:7-16.

3 Bain J, McLauchlan H, Elliott M, Cohen P. The specificities of protein kinase inhibitors: an update. Biochem J. 2003;371(Pt 1):199-204.

4 Suzuki T, Miyata N. Epigenetic control using natural products and synthetic molecules. Curr Med Chem. 2006:13(8):935-958.

5 Minich DM, Bland JS, Katke J, et al. Clinical safety and efficacy of NG440: a novel combination of rho iso-alpha acids from hops, rosemary, and oleanolic acid for inflammatory conditions. Can J Physiol Pharmacol. 2007;85(9):872-883.

6 Maeda-Yamamoto M, Inagaki N, Kitaura J, et al. O-methylated catechins from tea leaves inhibit multiple protein kinases in mast cells. J Immunol. 2004;172(7):4486-4492.

7 Lila MA. From beans to berries and beyond: teamwork between plant chemicals for protection of optimal human health. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2007;1114:372-380.

8 Langevin HM, Churchill DL, Cipolla MJ. Mechanical signaling through connective tissue: a mechanism for the therapeutic effect of acupuncture. FASEB J. 2001;15(12):2275-2282.

9 Langevin HM, Yandow JA. Relationship of acupuncture points and meridians to connective tissue planes. Anat Rec. 2002;269(6):

257-265.

10 Grimm D. Cell biology meets rolfing. Science. 2007;318:

1234-1235.

11 Segenès C, Miranville A, Lolmède K, Curat CA, Bouloumiè A. The role of endothelial cells in inflamed adipose tissue. J Intern Med. 2007;262:415-421.

Daily Exercise to regain the vitality of your youth

According to the US Surgeon General’s report, regular physical activity:

  • Improves your chances of living longer and living healthier
  • Protects against heart disease, high blood pressure and high cholesterol
  • Helps protects against certain cancers, including colon and breast cancer
  • Helps prevent or control type 2 diabetes  
  • Helps prevent arthritis and may help relieve pain and stiffness in people with this condition
  • Helps prevent the insidious loss of bone known as osteoporosis
  • Reduces the risk of falling among older adults
  • Relieves symptoms of depression and anxiety and improves mood

Exercise is about making your body’s well being a priority in your life.  The hardest part is finding the time right?  Well, time is a funny thing, there is always enough of it for the truely important stuff.  So if you find yourself saying “I just didn’t have time to do that.”  Please be honest with your self and restate this as “That just wasn’t important enough for me to spend the time doing it.”  This can be difficult at first, but being honest with yourself will take you several steps towards a happier healthier life.

Commit to 30 minutes each day to stretching and strengtheing your body.  This time a A+ priority, and nothing can replace it.  In a few short weeks you will begin to reep the rewards of a vibrant body and the the joyous life that comes with it.

Happy Easter everyone

10 reasons you fail to stay with a new exercise program

1.

Watch your posture at all times while exercising. Hanging on to the equipment, slouching cheating with wieghts will cause more harm than good.

2.

Keep your mind on what you are doing.  This is not social hour.  Focus on each part of your body until you feel the burn.

3. Not including cardio, strength training and stretching each session.
4.

Falling into a rut by not altering your routine.  Try adding an extra workout per week, increase your workout by 5-10 minutes, use interval training or add an incline, run in the opposite direction.

5. Believing exercise includes permission to eat anything.
6. Being impatient.  The body will grow into a younger you, but it takes time.  You have to work at it.
7.

Rushing.  Exercise must be about improving the mind body connection.  Rushing your reps is a good way to get injured and set back a couple months.

8.

Consuming sugary sports drinks or energy bars as if they are good for you.  Great marketing, bad idea.

9.

Burning out.  Not thinking long term.  This is a part of a new lifestyle that must be embraced for the remainder of your time here on earth.

10.

Advancing into more complicated techniques before the body is ready.  Stay with the basics for 2 years. You will understand what I’m saying later.

Most of all enjoy yourself, you will never stick to something unless it brings you pleasure.