Settling In to the new Clinic

I can’t say enough about how nice the energy is at our new location.  Everyone smiles just walking into the place.

I thought I would post a few pictures for everyone that has not stopped by yet.

I also wanted to remind everyone there is only one week left of the Grand Opening Special of buying 10 wellness treatments for $300.00 any method of payment.  After this week it goes back to it’s regular price of $400.00.

Please ask about the new Acugraph on your next visit and I will mark your file for a free Acupuncture exam.  This amazing computer technology is able to read your meridian energy and generate a complete report within minutes.  We will soon be charging $60.00 for this exam and report so make sure you reserve your’s now!

Anyway, here are some pictures.  They don’t come close to matching the light and energy of this place.  You have to see it in person to understand what I’m saying.  See you soon.

DrD

 

 

US Marines finding relief from post concussion headaches with acupunture

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Bryan Denton for the Wall Street Journal

Marine Lance Cpl. Tristan Bell was injured in a jarring explosion that tore apart his armored vehicle, slammed a heavy radio into the back of his head and left him tortured by dizziness, insomnia, headaches and nightmares.

He is recovering on a padded table at Camp Leatherneck, Afghanistan, beneath strings of soft, white Christmas lights, with the dulcet notes of “Tao of Healing” playing on an iPod and a forest of acupuncture needles sprouting from his head, ear, hands and feet.

In a bit of battlefield improvisation, the Navy is experimenting with acupuncture and soothing atmospherics to treat Marines suffering from mild cases of traumatic brain injury, commonly called concussions—the most prevalent wound of the Afghan war.

After hitting on the idea in late November, Cmdr. Keith Stuessi used acupuncture, along with the music and lights, to treat more than 20 patients suffering from mild brain injuries. All but two or three saw marked improvements, including easier sleep, reduced anxiety and fewer headaches, he says. Cmdr. Earl Frantz, who replaced Cmdr. Stuessi at Camp Leatherneck last month, has taken charge of the acupuncture project and treated 28 more concussion patients.

“I think a couple years down the road, this will be standard care,” predicts Cmdr. Stuessi, a sports-medicine specialist turned acupuncture acolyte. “At some point you have to drink the Kool-Aid, and I have drunk the Kool-Aid.”

While researchers are still investigating how exactly it works, studies have found that acupuncture can help relieve pain, stress and a range of other conditions. The newest Defense Department and Department of Veterans Affairs clinical guidelines recommend acupuncture as a supplementary therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder, pain, anxiety and sleeplessness.

The VA is recruiting candidates for a study of acupuncture’s effectiveness in treating PTSD and traumatic brain injury. Based on other studies of its benefits, “there is good reason to believe that acupuncture will induce recovery across a number of trauma spectrum dysfunctions in patients with TBI and PTSD, at low cost and with little risk,” the VA wrote.

In 2008, the Navy put Cmdr. Stuessi, a 44-year-old from Wales, Wis., and a handful of other doctors through a 300-hour acupuncture course. When he came to Afghanistan in August to create a clinic to treat concussions and minor physical injuries, the commander brought his collapsible needling table. He expected to use it for the usual array of sprained ankles and sore backs.

Once at Camp Leatherneck, though, Cmdr. Stuessi stumbled across an article about using acupuncture to treat PTSD and realized many of the symptoms overlapped with those of mild traumatic brain injury: insomnia, headache, memory deficit, attention deficit, irritability and anxiety.

Lance Cpl. Bell, 22, from Billings, Mont., was patrolling a ridgeline in mid-January when the Marines in his vehicle spotted a half-buried bomb in the road ahead. They backed up onto a second booby-trap, leaving five of the seven crewmen, including Lance Cpl. Bell, unconscious. He took medicine, but the headaches and insomnia grew relentless as the days passed. “If I took a nap, I’d have nightmares and crazy dreams,” he says. “I don’t take naps.”

He was waiting to see his regular doctor when Cmdr. Stuessi invited him to watch another Marine get acupuncture. The lance corporal hates needles, but he was getting desperate. The back of his head throbbed so hard it made his eyes hurt. “I thought, ‘Something has to change here—I want to get back out there,’ ” he recalls.

The night after his first session, he slept eight hours, twice what he had managed before. Soon he was returning eagerly every three days, when the benefits began to fade. He made a recent visit after a bad night, in which he woke up disoriented, headed out for a smoke and hit his head on the bunk bed.

When Lance Cpl. Bell showed up at Cmdr. Stuessi’s plywood office in a green Marine Corps sweatshirt and camouflage pants, the doctor turned off the overhead fluorescent light and switched on a string of Christmas lights his wife had shipped him. He shuffled his iPod from “Mack the Knife” to the flute notes of his healing music.

He slipped one needle into the top of the Marine’s head, and more into his left ear and hands. As he worked, he spoke softly of “chi,” which he described as the rush of numbness or warmth when the needle hits the spot, and “shen men,” a point in the ear connected to anxiety and stress. “This is Liver Three,” he said, sliding a needle into Lance Cpl. Bell’s left foot and moving it until the Marine felt the desired effect.

“Right there,” murmured Lance Cpl. Bell, letting his eyelids fall closed.

A 2008 RAND Corp. study found that one in five troops who serve in Iraq or Afghanistan suffers traumatic brain injury, ranging from severe head wounds to more common concussions. Standard treatment for the latter can involve painkillers, antianxiety medication, sleeping pills, counseling and group therapy.

Acupuncture immediately appeared to speed recovery, Cmdr. Stuessi says. His first patient, unable to sleep more than four hours a night despite two weeks of standard treatment, put in 10 hours the night after his initial needling. Most other patients have seen similar results.

Cmdr. Stuessi is unsure why acupuncture eases concussions. A few of Lance Cpl. Bell’s buddies remain unconvinced.

Lance Cpl. Dominic Collins, who shared a vehicle with Lance Cpl. Bell, was plagued by headaches after the bombing. One night in February, he dreamed he was being mortared. He rolled out of his bunk to take cover.

He declined the clinic’s offer of acupuncture. “It’s kind of not my thing,” he says. “I have tattoos, but it’s the idea of getting stuck” that puts him off.

One Marine tried jokingly to discourage Cpl. Francisco Sanchez, who hit two mines in one day, from using acupuncture by making him sit through an action movie in which the hero stabs the villain with a needle in the back of the neck. The villain’s eyes bleed. Then he dies.

But word has spread around camp, and Marines with everything from job stress to snuff addiction now plead for acupuncture.

“All we can say is we’ve learned from the Chinese on this,” Cmdr. Stuessi says. “They’ve been doing this for a couple thousand years.”

Write to Michael M. Phillips at michael.phillips@wsj.com

Acupuncture doesn’t need needles to work

Acupuncture works, but it appears to work equally well with or without needle penetration. This conclusion was drawn from a treatment study involving cancer patients suffering from nausea during radiotherapy.

In a series of acupuncture studies that involved more than 200 patients who were undergoing radiation treatment, roughly half received traditional acupuncture with needles penetrating the skin in particular points, while the others received simulated acupuncture instead, with a telescopic, blunt placebo needle that merely touched their skin.

Afterwards, 95 percent of the patients in both groups felt that the treatment had helped relieve nausea, and 67 percent had experienced other positive effects such as improved sleep, brighter mood, and less pain. Both groups felt considerably better than a separate control group that received no acupuncture of any kind.

The acupuncture was performed by physiotherapists two or three times a week during the five week long period of their radiation treatment.

Acupuncture beats aspirin for chronic headache

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Acupuncture works better than drugs like aspirin to reduce the severity and frequency of chronic headaches, U.S. researchers reported on Monday.

A review of studies involving nearly 4,000 patients with migraine, tension headache and other forms of chronic headache showed that that 62 percent of the acupuncture patients reported headache relief compared to 45 percent of people taking medications, the team at Duke University found.

“Acupuncture is becoming a favorable option for a variety of purposes, ranging from enhancing fertility to decreasing post-operative pain, because people experience significantly fewer side effects and it can be less expensive than other options,” Dr. Tong Joo Gan, who led the study, said in a statement.

“This analysis reinforces that acupuncture also is a successful source of relief from chronic headaches.”

Writing in Anesthesia and Analgesia, they said 53 percent of patients given true acupuncture were helped, compared to 45 percent receiving sham therapy involving needles inserted in non-medical positions.

“One of the barriers to treatment with acupuncture is getting people to understand that while needles are used, it is not a painful experience,” Gan said. “It is a method for releasing your body’s own natural painkillers.”

They found it took on average five to six visits for patients to report headache relief.

Other studies have shown that acupuncture helped alleviate pain in patients who had surgery for head and neck cancer, can relieve hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms and can reduce chemotherapy-induced nausea.

(Reporting by Maggie Fox; Editing by Julie Steenhuysen)

Acupuncture defined

Acupuncture

The above link takes you to the Acupuncture introduction page on www.harmonyhealth.com.  From there you will be able to navigate through over 40 pages of detailed information regarding this facinating procedure.  I have had several people asking for information about acupuncture so I wrote the following brief discription and posted it on my website.

A Chinese medical treatment based on the understanding that living bodies pulse and flow with an energy that is beyond the limited spectrum of the human eye similar to microwaves, or radiowaves.  Further, ALL diseases of the body begin with a disruption of this energy field that if left uncorrected will manifest as an ailment of the physical body.  After thousands of years of research a modern acupuncturist understands and uses a complex map of this energy field and by stimulating specific points, he can alleviate stagnation, and realign this energy field which will very shortly manifest as a decrease in pain and restoration of function in the bodies tissues.  Acupuncture is commonly used to control pain and to treat other conditions such as allergies, hypertension or addiction withdrawal. Acupuncture is one component of an overall program of Chinese medicine that is very similar to the modern wellness movement happening in America today.  

DrD